Decluttering Artwork

Nothing escapes my decluttering madness when it starts and my creative endeavors are no exception.

Sometimes I’m lucky and all the materials can be fully reclaimed. Hours and hours went into the meter long wide scarf I was making from a super yummy wool/cashmere mix but in reality it just looked like a pile of leftover birthday cake.

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When I pulled it out to reclaim the yarn, it left a pile of rainbow confetti ramen. IMG_0045

A run through on the Yarn Winder and I have fresh cakes ready for that as yet unfound perfect pattern:

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IMG_0047 Even the piece in progress from the first post I made is subject to scrutiny. It didn’t make it. Still like the lovely idea I had for a scarf. Using the lace thread popular here in Japan, I ran into the speed bump of having to pick up more at Yuzawaya and just never picked it up again to finish. I asked myself, “Why did I choose not to finish this project?” In the end it doesn’t matter, I’ll never finish it or be satisfied if I ever do. So I’ve ripped out as much as possible down to the Wedding Ring chain pattern. Sure I’ll keep the chain for another project but it will likely be tossed in the next round of decluttering madness.

What cannot be reclaimed, repurposed or given away to even one’s mother to love will need to go to the garbage bin.  This huge (1 meter across) black snowflake needs such a home. It reminds me too much of a yucky spiderweb so I’m applying to the Art Bin Project by Michael Landy at the Yokohama Triennale to bin it.

 

IMG_0018 But will my bad art idea be good enough? Will I be able to give it a chance to be rejected with dignity in an art museum with a tribe of other rejected art?

How long did it take you to make that?

I am often asked this question when someone is viewing one of my projects, same as many other artists hear.

We could all answer years, decades or even a lifetime we have spent honing our skills, learning our craft, debating which subject matter in which medium will touch the viewer most. Simply printing a single page which should take no more than 2 or 3 minutes can lead to hours of wrangling with computer programming hiccups, hardware problems, printer errors and ink cartridges as drained as the artist.

But that isn’t the answer they want to hear. It makes what we do inaccessible to our audience. I like to see the viewer connecting with my work, seeing the next evolution of possibilities and expressing those “What if…” thoughts.

As I start to fully dive into what it’s going to take to complete my Tropical Butterfly Garden Art Installation I have started keeping track of the hours. Using the HoursTracker App I’ve added in the maximum allowed 3 “Jobs” available in the free version.
1. Research & Development
2. Marketing
3. Construction

I know that I will need to have some parts of my piece completed even before I get to the Artist Residency Site. I am hoping keeping track of my progress will help me keep on track to complete the project as I have planned it to be.

So far I have completed:
1. 53 minutes of R & D: Which Tropical Butterflies do I wish to concentrate my efforts? Which wire sizes, colors and quantities should I obtain?
2. 95 minutes of Marketing: Searching for indy yarn dyers, Setting up a Tumblr Account, Maintaining current connections, updating website, etc..
3. 0 minutes of Construction

Debated with myself if my search for source materials (indy yarn dyers) should be a part of Research & Development but chose Marketing because I will be connecting with real people. In the end, it is doubtful that those who ask, “How long did it take you to make that?” will want this much detail. But, I am that curious to know.

Thinking About Layers

Another Tokyo-based artist, Arthur J Huang, on his current Interstices project. Stay cool out there!

Arthur J Huang

Today, I went to Kojimachi despite the 31˚C heat and humidity to take some more Kojimachi Interstices photographs.  I had planned to take photographs of 24 blocks in the Kojimachi area.  After taking photographs of 18 blocks and having the heat get the better of me, I stopped for some iced tea and realized that 2 hours had passed.  I have over 160 new photographs to work on tonight and tomorrow.  I will have to do a better job of pacing myself tomorrow when I go back to take photographs of the remaining 6 blocks and maybe more.

Before I left for Kojimachi, I was cleaning up my studio and came across several packs of clear film which reminded me of an idea I had when I was working on the Interstices series last year.  I thought it might be interesting to print individual Interstices photographs on clear film and…

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In-Between Large Projects

I can finally see the floor of my tatami room studio again! Finishing one big project and before jumping into the next big projects(s), I’ve spent my time “spring” cleaning my studio.

As a very visual person I like to see all my options at one time. All my pieces, all my mediums displayed within easy reach as I work. In reality, this means pulling everything from their boxes, drawers, and shelves out onto whatever flat surface I can find, so by the end of a project it looks like my studio has projectile vomited all over itself.

This In-Between Large Projects time is all about putting these items back in their home, deciding if I really need to keep 6 different kinds of metalsmithing hammers and where to hang my latest art acquisitions.

I do have a couple of small creative projects going that I pick up during breaks in the deep cleaning but have essentially kept the major projects on the back burner. Yet, their presence still leaks through, the ideas still simmering and flowing out:

1. Last night I tweaked my Tako Stir Fry Recipe with a bit of kabocha.

2. Decided the Travel Journal Art Books I am creating need a larger number of pages than what I am currently putting together.

3. That pot of simmering projects on the horizon may be on a bit too high the more I watch video podcasts. I’m beginning to think video documenting my progress wire crocheting the Tropical Butterfly Garden art installation will be a great idea!

Eek! Turning that burner down a bit.

Electric Butterflies Art Installation – Photos and Video

Fully set up at Kotoriya Studio at Shiro Oni Studios in Onishi, Gunma Japan, Electric Butterflies had it’s debut during Onishi’s Natsu Matsuri.

Created during my Artist Residency there, Electric Butterflies is an art installation exploring the demise & disposal of the electronic personality. A technological reclamation art installation project combining metals and fibers.

What happens when our computer dies? What happens to the electronic personality upon our death?

Providing an explosive view of a laptop at the moment of its death, Electric Butterflies, demonstrates the release of the electronic personality within through the hand-crocheted neon yarn butterfly motifs and supportive wire crochet accents.

As small electronics continue to be pervasive in our society, society also has a need to address the demise and the disposal of our electronic personality and its toxic body, a laptop in this case, the same as we carefully handle the death of a loved one.

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Nighttime at Kotoriya Studio as the Summer Festival parade thunders by to the beat of the taiko drums.

Thank You very much to my photographer friends who have been able to capture my Electric Butterflies so much better than I. These photos belong to them.

IMG_0158 Electric Butterflies fills a space measuring 250cm x 350cm (approx 8 feet x 11.5 feet) Despite its size it doesn’t weigh very much, the laptop pieces and the aluminum framing are the heaviest items so it is easy to maneuver, transport and hang.

A flock of neon butterflies carries away the dying electronic personality and parts of its computer body;IMG_0164

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Check out the YouTube video for another perspective:

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Neon yellow yarn with sparkly blue embroidery floss create the butterfly wing motif developing as it flows away from the initial point of its death:

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Orange neon yarn wing motif with the black doily covered battery, IMG_0168 IMG_0169 Misc computer wire covered in orange neon yarn with butterfly wing motif.

IMG_0171 Keyboard detail, the butterflies have burst forth from this point carrying various keys from the keyboard.

Laptop Cover is also blown away to the opposite site of the installation. IMG_0174 Butterfly wing motif is created using wire crochet and yarn techniques.

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電気蝶 オープンスタジオ

ー 電気蝶 ー

電子的な個性の逝去と処理。
金属と繊維を組み合わせた科学技術開拓のアート導入プロジェクト。

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【日  時】土曜日, 7月 12日 & 日曜日, 7月13日

【会  場】Kotoriya Studio at Shiro Oni Studio: シロ・オニ・スタジオ: 〒370-1401 群馬県藤岡市鬼石529

アクセス: http://www.shirooni.com/ja/about/directions/

【参加費】 無料

【詳 細】www.studiodeanna.com

ー 電気蝶 ー
電子的な個性の逝去と処理。
金属と繊維を組み合わせた科学技術開拓のアート導入プロジェクト。
コンピュータが逝去した時に一体何が起きるのだろうか? 私達に死が訪れた時、電子的な個性は一体どうなるのだろうか?
ラップトップの逝去の瞬間、電子蝶、を爆発的な光景で提供する事により、電子的な物性の解放を、蛍光色の毛糸を使用した鍵編み(手編み)の蝶のモチーフと、それを支える針金を使用した鍵編みのアクセントで実演した。
私達の社会の中で、小さな電子が引き続き普及する様に、社会も電子的な個性やその有毒な本体(この場合はラップトップ)の逝去と処理を、私達が愛するものの死を慎重に扱うのと同様に取り扱う必要がある。

IMG_0012_2  鬼石祭囃子 http://www.shirooni.com/ja/events/onishi-festival/

Open Studio Invitation- Electric Butterflies Art Installation

Come for the Open Studio, stay for the Summer Festival (Natsu Matsuri) in Onishi!
Grab your Suica Card and jump on the train. Get out of the big city for a summer day trip!
My latest work is an installation piece entitled:
– Electric Butterflies –
Demise & Disposal of the electronic personality.
A technological reclamation art installation project combining metals and fibers.
What happens when our computer dies? What happens to the electronic personality upon our death?
Providing an explosive view of a laptop at the moment of its death, Electric Butterflies, demonstrates the release of the electronic personality within through the hand-crocheted neon yarn butterfly motifs and supportive wire crochet accents.
As small electronics continue to be pervasive in our society, society also has a need to address the demise and the disposal of our electronic personality and its toxic body, a laptop in this case, the same as we carefully handle the death of a loved one.
When: Saturday, July 12 & 13, 2014
Where: Kotoriya at Shiro Oni Studio in Onishi, Gunma, Japan
   370-1401 Funma Fujioka Onishi 529 Japan
Directions From Tokyo to Studio (by train and bus, no pickup required)

From AKABANE station Take TAKASAKI SEN line North toward TAKASAKI. The train also stops at IKEBUKURO and SHINJUKU, though less often. Get off at HONJO Station (about an hour and a half, around 1600 yen).

Then take a BUS from HONJO station: Walk out ticket gate. Go RIGHT. walk down the stairs. There are three bus stops. Go to the stop on the far RIGHT, in front of the 7-Eleven. Last bus is at 8:15pm weekend, 9pm. weekday. Take bus to ONISHI YUBIN KYOKU MAE 鬼石郵便局前. (40 minutes, 640 yen)

Walk toward the stoplight. Turn RIGHT at corner. Walk about 1 minute. Shiro Oni studio is on your right. (3 minutes)

Map of Kotoriya Studio in Onishi: I’ll be at the Red #3 location:

English map of the town of Onishi, Japan, part of the Shiro Oni Studio artist in residency program.  Information about Fressay supermarket, onishi post office, onishi hospital, onshi Toduka drug store, and Ginkatei chinese restaurant